Category Archives: Earth Sciences

Earth got first whiff of oxygen 3.2 billion years ago

The first oxygen-producing life-forms appeared hundreds of millions of years earlier than previously known, new evidence suggests. Analyzing iron and uranium embedded inside primeval rocks, researchers discovered that shallow seawater contained whiffs of dissolved oxygen around 3.2 billion years ago. … Continue reading

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We’re Oversalting Our Food, And It’s Not What You Think

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Three Category 4 hurricanes have just hit the Pacific Ocean at the same time

For the first time in recorded history, three Category 4 hurricanes have appeared in the Pacific Ocean at the same time, and they’re inching ever-closer to the Big Island of Hawaii. The never-before-seen meteorological event involves the hurricanes Kilo, Ignacio, … Continue reading

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Lightning in Super Slow Motion

A clip from Discovery Channel’s “Raging Planet” on the subject of lightning. If you find lightning a fascinating beautiful force, then check this clip out. The camera technology has gotten to where scientists have been able to record and playback … Continue reading

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The Decade Volcanoes

The Decade Volcanoes

The science of volcanology is relatively young when you consider our species has a knack for building where we shouldn’t. Volcanic soils are well known for their fertility and as such many societies throughout history have settled in volcanic regions, … Continue reading

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Life in a sinkhole

sinkhole

The karst landscapes of China have been an essential part of their figurative art and painting since time immemorial, capturing the imagination and providing a sense of wonder at nature. The sinkholes here form when underground rivers carve out underground … Continue reading

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A ‘mini ice age’ is coming in the next 15 years

A new model that predicts the solar cycles more accurately than ever before has suggested that solar activity will drop by 60 percent between 2030 and 2040, which means in just 15 years’ time, Earth could sink into what researchers … Continue reading

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The unique geology of Macquarie Island

macquarie island

Macquarie Island is located in the south-west Pacific Ocean, between Australia and New Zealand, and officially belongs to the Australian state of Tasmania. The island is tiny, only 5 km (3.1 mi) wide and 35 km (21.7 mi) long, covering … Continue reading

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Rare up close footage of Lava entering the ocean

Rare footage of lava entering the ocean from a very unique,dangerous and up close angle, watch the creation of new land right before your very eyes on the rugged volcanic coastline on the island of Hawaii.

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The “Dying” Sea?

The Dead Sea is a hypersaline lake with a salinity level of 33.7% that borders Jordan, Israel and the West Bank and covers an area of ~600 km2 (230 sq mi). Hypersaline means that it has an unusually high concentration … Continue reading

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The world’s loudest sound caused shock waves 100,000 times that of a hydrogen bomb

On 27 August 1883, the Earth made the loudest noise in recorded history. Emanating from the island of Krakatoa, which sits between the islands of Java and Sumatra in Indonesia, the sound could be heard clearly almost 5,000 kilometres away … Continue reading

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Houston, we have a weight problem

According to Chris Smith, a microbiologist, and Dave Ansel, a Cambridge University physicist, the earth is gaining 40,000 tonnes of space dust every year. But fear not! Despite this enormous weight gain, we are still managing to lose around 50,000 … Continue reading

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Verticality

One of the fundamental principles of geology is that sedimentary rocks are deposited in horizontal layers due to gravity. There are some exceptions, including cross beds and rocks deposited on steep slopes, but the rule is a very good guide. … Continue reading

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A 2,000-year-old, hidden goldmine has been discovered in Spain

Airborne lasers have uncovered a 1st century BC Roman goldmine hidden beneath crops and vegetation in northern Spain. Scientists have found a 2,000-year-old network of channels and reservoirs in the Eria river valley of Leon, Spain, that would have been … Continue reading

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Sun’s rotating ‘magnet’ pulls lightning towards UK

The Sun may be playing a part in the generation of lightning strikes on Earth by temporarily ‘bending’ the Earth’s magnetic field and allowing a shower of energetic particles to enter the upper atmosphere. This is according to researchers at … Continue reading

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The story of pahoehoe

This is really a fascinating photo. Did you ever think that a chain link fence would hold up against lava? Of course, given enough time, the fence isn’t going to hold up, but this photo illustrates some of the most … Continue reading

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Earth’s magnetic field could flip much faster than previously predicted

A new study suggests that Earth’s magnetic field could take just 100 years to flip – and there’s evidence it could happen again in a couple of thousand years. We think of north and south as being pretty constant, but … Continue reading

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Climate change: Models ‘underplay plant CO2 absorption’

Global climate models have underestimated the amount of CO2 being absorbed by plants, according to new research. Scientists say that between 1901 and 2010, living things absorbed 16% more of the gas than previously thought. The authors say it explains … Continue reading

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Icebergs once drifted to Florida, new climate model suggests

Using a first-of-its-kind, high-resolution numerical model to describe ocean circulation during the last ice age about 21,000 year ago, oceanographer Alan Condron of the University of Massachusetts Amherst has shown that icebergs and meltwater from the North American ice sheet … Continue reading

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Undulatus asperatus

Undulatus asperatus is a cloud formation, proposed in 2009 as a separate cloud classification by the founder of the Cloud Appreciation Society. If successful it will be the first cloud formation added since cirrus intortus in 1951 to the International Cloud … Continue reading

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