The Autumn Equinox Is Almost Here

As the midday sun begins to sink lower and nights get noticeably longer, it can only mean the reign of summer is coming to an end for the northern half of the world. The autumn equinox arrives at 10:21 a.m. ET (2:20 p.m. UTC) on September 22, officially marking the beginning of fall in the Northern Hemisphere and the start of spring in the Southern Hemisphere.

The word “equinox” comes from Latin and means “equal night,” referring to the roughly 12-hour day and night that occurs only on the two equinox days of the year.This tidy split in our 24-hour day is linked to the reason Earth has seasons in the first place. The planet spins on an axis that is tilted 23.5 degrees with respect to its orbital plane. That means as Earth travels along its 365-day orbit, different hemispheres tilt closer to or farther from our sun’s warming rays.

An equinox is a geometrical alignment between the sun and Earth in which the sun appears positioned right above our planet’s equator. On these days, both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres experience roughly equal amounts of sunshine. It’s also only on the spring and autumn equinoxes that the sun rises due east and sets due west.

As we head toward December, the Northern Hemisphere will tilt farther away from the sun and receive its rays at a steeper angle, creating longer shadows and cooler conditions indicative of winter. Eventually, the sun will reach its lowest point in the midday sky, marking the December solstice.

Cultures around the world have historically celebrated the dates that represent the changing of the seasons. One notable example is an ancient Maya step pyramid known as El Castillo at Chichén Itzá in Mexico. Exactly at sunset on the spring and autumn equinoxes, sunlight hits the building’s steep staircase at just the right angle to create an eerie snake-like shape that appears to slither along its length.

More here: The Autumn Equinox Is Almost Here—What You Need to Know

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One Response to The Autumn Equinox Is Almost Here

  1. alfh says:

    There seems to be an error in an otherwise interesting article. We “receive its rays at a steeper angle, creating longer shadows”. No, when the sun’s angle is steep (high in the sky) the shadow length is shorter, not longer.
    Nice picture of autumn colours.
    I have often heard the tale about the pyramid at Chichén Itzá but have never seen a film clip of the “snake action”. Jim, are you able to do this for us?

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