Look up! This week’s solstice coincides with a strawberry moon

For everyone in the Northern Hemisphere, this Monday marks the summer solstice, the longest day of the year. And if that’s not enough of a reason to head outside and look up, for the first time in almost 50 years, the event will also fall on the same day as a full ‘strawberry moon’ – two events that only coincide roughly once in a generation.

On its own, a strawberry moon isn’t that rare – it’s the name given to any full moon occurring in June, and was named by indigenous Americans as it signalled the beginning of strawberry season. The June full moon has also been called the ‘honey moon’ because the summer month is so popular with Northern Hemisphere weddings.

The solstice also occurs twice a year – once in winter, once in summer – when the Sun stops travelling north and begins to head south again. But what is rare is for the strawberry moon to fall exactly on the summer solstice in the Northern Hemisphere. Source: Look up! This week’s solstice coincides with a strawberry moon

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