Ball’s Pyramid

Ball’s Pyramid

An isolated pillar of rock thrusting up from the southern Pacific Ocean is said to be the highest rock pinnacle in the world. Looking at it on a map, the tiny dot that marks Ball’s Pyramid is almost lost in the surrounding ocean, but those who come face to face with the sea-stack in real life can hardly believe their eyes. Although only about 440yds (400m) across at its base, Ball’s Pyramid reaches a height of more than 1800ft (550m)—almost twice the height of the Eiffel Tower.

Lying off Australia’s east co ast and named after Henry Lidgbird Ball in 1788, Ball’s Pyramid is about 435 miles (700km) northeast of Sydney. The solo aviator Francis Chinchester, looking down on the great rock during his trans-Tasman flight of 1931, described it as a ‘broad primeval dagger of stone’. But this giant-sized Excalibur reveals its secrets not from the sky but under the sea.

Beneath the ocean’s glassy surface, myriad brightly coloured fish dart round rock columns and under arches. Their playground is a plateau of volcanic rock, for Ball’s Pyramid is a crumbling, long-extinct volcano with only its peak above the water. It is one of a series of volcanoes that became inactive 7 million years ago. Source: Facebook

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