Harold “Doc” Edgerton

edgerton5Harold E. Edgerton, in full Harold Eugene Edgerton (born April 6, 1903, Fremont, Nebraska, U.S.—died January 4, 1990, Cambridge, Massachusetts), American electrical engineer and photographer who was noted for creating high-speed photography techniques that he applied to scientific uses.

Edgerton earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the University of Nebraska in 1925 and received master’s (1927) and doctoral (1931) degrees in the same field from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge. He taught at MIT from 1928, becoming a full professor there in 1948.

In 1926, as a graduate student, Edgerton began to experiment with flash tubes. He developed a tube using xenon gas that could produce high-intensity bursts of light as short as 1/1,000,000 second. Edgerton’s tube remains the basic flash device used in still photography. The xenon flash could also emit repeated bursts of light at regular and very brief intervals and was thus an ideal stroboscope. With his new flash Edgerton was able to photograph the action of such things as drops of milk falling into a saucer, a tennis racket hitting a ball, and bullets hitting a steel plate or traveling at speeds of up to 2,800 feet (853 metres) per second. The resulting images often possessed artistic beauty in addition to their value to industry and science.

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Edgerton explored many uses for his new photographic equipment. During World War II he constructed stroboscopic units to photograph the night operations of enemy troops. After the war he and his associates photographed nuclear test explosions. He later devised methods and equipment to photograph sea life at unprecedented depths. Via Harold E. Edgerton. Thanks to Phil Krause for suggesting this post.

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2 Responses to Harold “Doc” Edgerton

  1. alfy says:

    Fascinating, Jim, but I couldn’t work out what the circular/spherical object was. Tell us, do.

  2. Deskarati says:

    It’s a picture of an atomic bomb exploding. Edgerton became a prime contractor for the Atomic Energy Commission and had a major role in photographing and recording nuclear tests for the United States through the fifties and sixties.

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