Electron organization at the quantum level

This microscope image shows thermometers (top and bottom) and a heater (right) connected via 50-micrometer-wide gold wires to a black rectangle of the ytterbium dirhodium disilicide (center) that is only three-quarters of a millimeter wide. Using this setup, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids in Dresden, Germany, induced a thermal current by setting up a small difference in temperature at the two ends of the sample. The proportionality coefficient between this temperature difference and the thermal power provided by the heater defined the thermal conductivity of the sample, which was found to violate traditional laws of physics when the material was cooled to a "quantum critical point."

A new study finds that “quantum critical points” in exotic electronic materials can act much like polarizing “hot button issues” in an election. Reporting in Nature, researchers from Rice University, two Max Planck Institutes in Dresden, Germany, and UCLA find that on either side of a quantum critical point, electrons fall into line and behave as traditionally expected, but at the critical point itself, traditional physical laws break down.

“The beauty of the quantum critical point is that even though it’s only one point along the zero temperature axis, what happens at that point dictates how electrons will interact in the material under a broad set of physical conditions,” said study co-author Qimiao Si, a theoretical physicist at Rice University. The new study involved “heavy-fermion metals,” magnetic materials with many similarities to high-temperature superconductors.

Flowing electrons power all the lights, computers and gadgets that are plugged into the world’s energy grids, and physicists have spent more than a century describing how these electrons behave. But long-standing theories that describe how electrons interact in traditional metals and semiconductors have yet to explain the strange electronic properties of heavy-fermion metals, human-made composites that contain precise atomic arrangements of transition metals and rare earth elements.

In the new study, Si collaborated with a group of experimental physicists led by Frank Steglich at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids. The researchers examined several physical properties at extremely cold temperatures — some as much as 10 times colder than any such previous measurements — to show exactly how the standard theory of electron correlations in metals breaks down at the quantum critical point (QCP). That theory, Landau’s Fermi liquid theory, was first introduced in 1956.

“By measuring the ratio of the thermal to electrical transport near the QCP in one of the most-studied heavy-fermion metals — ytterbium dirhodium disilicide — we found a breakdown in the fundamental concepts of Landau-Fermi liquid theory,” said Steglich, the founding director of the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids.

via Electron politics: Physicists probe organization at the quantum level.

This entry was posted in Physics. Bookmark the permalink.