Tenerife island landscape reveals explosive past

Pablo Dávila-Harris looks at part of the huge landslide deposit discovered on Tenerife, showing the chaotic and shattered rubble from the collapsed volcano. (The central dark debris-block is about 15 meters in diameter and must weigh many tons). Credit: Pablo Dávila-Harris

Volcanologists from the University of Leicester have uncovered one of the world’s best-preserved accessible examples of a monstrous landslide that followed a huge volcanic eruption on the Canarian island of Tenerife.

Seven hundred and thirty-three thousand years ago, the southeast slopes of Tenerife collapsed into the sea, during the volcanic eruption. The onshore remains of this landslide have just been discovered amid the canyons and ravines of Tenerife’s desert landscape by volcanologists Pablo Dávila-Harris and Mike Branney of the University of Leicester’s Department of Geology.

Dr Branney said: “It is one of the world’s best-preserved accessible examples of such an awesome phenomenon, because the debris from such landslides mostly spreads far across the deep ocean floor, inaccessible for close study.

via Tenerife island landscape reveals explosive past.

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