Scientists get first detailed look at nitrogen doping in single-layer graphene

A close-up, three-dimensional image of a single nitrogen atom in a sheet of graphene - a material made of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb pattern. The larger nitrogen atom sticks out above its carbon neighbors and contributes about half of its extra electron to the graphene lattice, changing its electronic properties. The image was made with a scanning tunneling microscope. Image courtesy of Science/AAAS

Researchers are working on ways to tune the properties of graphene for specific electronic applications. One way to do that is by doping – introducing small amounts of other elements, such as nitrogen or phosphorus, that either add or subtract electrons from the system.

Widely used in silicon technology, doping has been carried out experimentally in single-layer graphene sheets; but until now, the details of how the dopant atoms fit into the sheet and bond with their carbon neighbors remained elusive.

 

via Scientists get first detailed look at nitrogen doping in single-layer graphene.

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