Brain’s ‘radio stations’ have much to tell scientists

After years of mapping the brain’s activity, a new method has started to show the importance of the frequency of that activity. This is being shown by attaching a grid of electrodes directly to the brain – Deskarati

“Analysis of brain function normally focuses on where brain activity happens and when,” says Eric C. Leuthardt, MD. “What we’ve found is that the wavelength of the activity provides a third major branch of understanding brain physiology.”

Scientists normally measure brainwaves with a process called electroencephalography (EEG), which places electrodes on the scalp. But for this researchers used electrocorticography, a technique for monitoring the brain with a grid of electrodes temporarily implanted directly on the brain’s surface. Clinically, Leuthardt and other neurosurgeons use this approach to identify the source of persistent, medication-resistant seizures in patients and to map those regions for surgical removal. With the patient’s permission, scientists can also use the electrode grid to experimentally monitor a much larger spectrum of brain activity than they can via conventional brainwave monitoring.

“We get better signals and can much more precisely determine where those signals come from, down to about one centimeter,” Leuthardt, assistant professor of neurosurgery, of neurobiology and of biomedical engineering, says. “Also, EEG can only monitor frequencies up to 40 hertz, but with electrocorticography we can monitor activity up to 500 hertz. That really gives us a unique opportunity to study the complete physiology of brain activity.”

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